Items filtered by date: August 2020

Monday, 31 August 2020 00:00

Do I Have an Ankle Sprain?

Unlike a strain, which is an injury to muscle or tendon tissue, a sprain occurs when there is an injury to a ligament. Ankle sprains can be categorized as being Grade 1, Grade 2, or Grade 3. A Grade 1 sprain means the fibers of a ligament have been stretched, not torn, whereas a Grade 2 sprain means the ligament has been partially torn. Grade 3 sprains are described as an injury that causes a ligament to completely tear or rupture. Common symptoms of an ankle sprain include bruising, pain, and swelling of the affected area. For a proper diagnosis and information on how to treat a sprain, please consult with a podiatrist.

Although ankle sprains are common, they aren’t always minor injuries. If you need your ankle injury looked at, contact Philip Shupe, DPM from California. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

How Does an Ankle Sprain Occur?

Ankle sprains are the result of a tear in the ligaments within the ankle. These injuries may happen when you make a rapid shifting movement while your foot is planted. A less common way to sprain your ankle is when your ankle rolls inward while your foot turns outward.

What Are the Symptoms?

  • Pain at the sight of the tear
  • Bruising/Swelling
  • Ankle area is tender to touch
  • In severe cases, may hear/feel something tear
  • Skin discoloration

Preventing a Sprain

  • Wearing appropriate shoes for the occasion
  • Stretching before exercises and sports
  • Knowing your limits

Treatment of a Sprain

In many cases, the RICE method (Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevate) is used to treat ankle sprains. However, you should see a podiatrist to see which treatment option would work best with your injury. In severe cases, surgery may be required.

It is important to ask your doctor about rehab options after you receive treatment for your injury. Stretching, strength training, and balance exercises may help the ankle heal while also preventing further injury.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Glendale, CA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Monday, 24 August 2020 00:00

When Should I Visit a Podiatrist?

Podiatrists are professional experts in taking care of the feet and ankles. Typical conditions that podiatrists diagnose and treat include broken bones, sprains, bunions, ingrown toenails, corns and calluses, and warts to name a few. Podiatrists also help diagnose pain in the feet, ankles, and heels that may be leading to more serious ailments. These can include plantar fasciitis, stress fractures, Morton’s neuroma, and heel spurs. High risk patients, such as those who have diabetes, suffer from arthritis, or the elderly who are at a higher risk of falling, are encouraged to be under the care of a podiatrist. If you or a loved one is considered high risk for developing any of the conditions mentioned, or is currently experiencing any type of foot pain, it is recommended to consult with a podiatrist.

If you are experiencing pain in the feet or ankles, don’t join the stubborn majority refusing treatment. Feel free to contact Philip Shupe, DPM from California. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is a Podiatrist?

Someone would seek the care of a podiatrist if they have suffered a foot injury or have common foot ailments such as heal spurs, bunions, arch problems, deformities, ingrown toenails, corns, foot and ankle problems, etc.

Podiatric Treatment

A podiatrist will treat the problematic areas of the feet, ankle or lower leg by prescribing the following:

  • Physical therapy
  • Drugs
  • Orthotic inserts or soles
  • Surgery on lower extremity fractures

A common podiatric procedure a podiatrist will use is a scanner or force plate which will allow the podiatrist to know the designs of orthotics. Patients are then told to follow a series of tasks to complete the treatment. The computer will scan the foot a see which areas show weight distribution and pressure points. The podiatrist will read the analysis and then determine which treatment plans are available.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Glendale, CA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 17 August 2020 00:00

How Can I Prevent Running Injuries?

Injury to the foot and ankle can be common among runners. Fortunately, there are steps you can take to help prevent injuries. It is said when you first start running, build up your training regimen slowly, increasing the amount of time and distance that you run at a very gradual pace. Allow your body and feet adequate time to adjust, as well as rest and heal. It is also important to develop a good running technique. This can be accomplished through running lessons, where an instructor can teach you about proper foot placement and other techniques to ensure that you stay safe while you run. Finally, make sure that you wear supportive, properly-fitted running shoes when you exercise. For more advice on preventing running injuries, consult with a podiatrist today.

Exercising your feet regularly with the proper foot wear is a great way to prevent injuries. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact Philip Shupe, DPM of California. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

How to Prevent Running Injuries

Many common running injuries are caused by overuse and overtraining. When the back of the kneecap starts wearing out and starts causing pain in your knee, this is commonly referred to as runner’s knee. Runner’s knee is a decrease in strength in your quadriceps and can occur if you’re not wearing properly fitted or supporting shoes. To prevent runner’s knee, focusing on hip strengthening is a good idea, as well as strengthening your quads to keep the kneecaps aligned.

What Are Some Causes of Running Injuries?
- One cause of a common running injury is called iliotibial band syndrome.
- Plantar fasciitis is also another common injury.
- Stress fractures can occur from overtraining, lack of calcium, or even your running style.

Best Ways to Prevent Running Injuries
- Wear footwear that fits properly and suits your running needs.
- Running shoes are the only protective gear that runners have to safeguard them from injury.
- Make a training schedule. Adding strengthening exercises as well as regular stretching can help keep you strong and limber and can lessen the possibility of injuries.
- Stretching keeps muscles limber; this will help you gain better flexibility.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Glendale, CA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 10 August 2020 00:00

Where Is the Achilles Tendon Located?

The medical term for the Achilles tendon is the calcaneal tendon. It is located in the back of the leg, and connects the calf muscles to the heel. It is considered to be one of the longest tendons in the body, and is used during walking and running activities. An injury to the Achilles tendon may occur as a result of not warming up adequately before beginning an exercise program. Achilles tendonitis or a rupture can cause severe pain and discomfort. Patients may be susceptible to experiencing this type of injury with existing flat feet or tight calf muscles. There are prevention techniques that can be implemented which may help to reduce the risk of incurring an Achilles tendon injury. These can include stretching before any type of exercise is pursued, in addition to wearing shoes that fit correctly. If you have pain in your heel or if your calf muscles are stiff, please consult with a podiatrist who can properly diagnose and treat Achilles tendon injuries.

Achilles tendon injuries need immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact Philip Shupe, DPM of California. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is the Achilles Tendon?

The Achilles tendon is a tendon that connects the lower leg muscles and calf to the heel of the foot. It is the strongest tendon in the human body and is essential for making movement possible. Because this tendon is such an integral part of the body, any injuries to it can create immense difficulties and should immediately be presented to a doctor.

What Are the Symptoms of an Achilles Tendon Injury?

There are various types of injuries that can affect the Achilles tendon. The two most common injuries are Achilles tendinitis and ruptures of the tendon.

Achilles Tendinitis Symptoms

  • Inflammation
  • Dull to severe pain
  • Increased blood flow to the tendon
  • Thickening of the tendon

Rupture Symptoms

  • Extreme pain and swelling in the foot
  • Total immobility

Treatment and Prevention

Achilles tendon injuries are diagnosed by a thorough physical evaluation, which can include an MRI. Treatment involves rest, physical therapy, and in some cases, surgery. However, various preventative measures can be taken to avoid these injuries, such as:

  • Thorough stretching of the tendon before and after exercise
  • Strengthening exercises like calf raises, squats, leg curls, leg extensions, leg raises, lunges, and leg presses

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Glendale, CA. We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

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Diabetic patients are often aware of the importance of maintaining proper foot care. Cuts, bruises, or scrapes on the feet can lead to serious foot conditions, and practicing correct wound care is essential for avoiding potential foot ulcers. There are methods that can be implemented that may help to protect the feet from painful wounds developing. These can include checking the feet daily between the toes and on the bottom of the feet. Existing wounds can benefit from keeping the dressings clean, and this can be accomplished by frequently changing the dressing. If you have wounds on your feet, it is strongly suggested that you speak to a podiatrist who can help you with proper wound care management.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Philip Shupe, DPM from California. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Glendale, CA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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